Resultados: 5

    WHO guidelines for the use of thermal ablation for cervical pre-cancer lesions

    The objectives of these guidelines are to provide evidence-based guidance on the use of thermal ablation to treat cervical precancer; and to support countries to update their national guidelines for the use of thermal ablation for cervical precancer....

    World Health Organization Guidelines for treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2-3 and screen-and-treat strategies to prevent cervical cancer

    Int. j. gynaecol. obstet; 132 (2), 2016
    "BACKGROUND: It is estimated that 1%-2% of women develop cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2-3 (CIN 2-3) annually worldwide. The prevalence among women living with HIV is higher, at 10%. If left untreated, CIN 2-3 can progress to cervical cancer. WHO has previously published guidelines for strateg...

    Guía de Práctica Clínica ​(GPC) para el manejo del cáncer de cuello uterino invasivo

    Generar recomendaciones para el tratamiento quirúrgico del cáncer de cuello uterino, de acuerdo al estadio. Generar recomendaciones para el tratamiento no quirúrgico del cáncer de cuello uterino, quimioterapia y radioterapia....

    WHO guidelines for treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2-3 and adenocarcinoma in situ: cryotherapy, large loop excision of the transformation zone, and cold knife conization

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is a premalignant lesion that is diagnosed by histology as CIN1, CIN2, or CIN3. If left untreated, CIN2 or CIN3 (collectively referred to as CIN2+) can progress to cervical cancer. There are three principal treatments for CIN available in low- and middle-income co...

    WHO guidelines Use of cryotherapy for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    In 2008, cervical cancer was responsible for 275 000 deaths, of which about 88% occurred in low- and middle-income countries. Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide and the most common cancer in many low- and middle-income countries. Because it has a typically slow progression...